Lots of Snakes

reptiglo:

history1970s:

history1970s:

Depending on how many babies my emperor scorpion has, I may have some to give away to people on here. 
Note: Please be experienced in taking care of scorpions/arachnids in general; at the very least, please read up and understand the kind of maintenance they require. You can’t just put them in any old environment and expect them to be comfortable. Likewise, I wouldn’t want anyone asking for them “just because they’re cool”/for the novelty factor.

With that out of the way,

My female emperor scorpion is having babies right now as I type this. I currently don’t know how many she’ll have but a safe guess is 12-20. 

If you want one, I could mail you one. If you live in the Chicago area, you could drive by and pick one up. $20 for a baby but I’m willing to go lower if you live closer/or are a friend.

Reblog this if you know anyone that may want one…? I guess..? If you want one yourself send me an ask, but my asks are kinda fucked up rn so I may not get it, more reliable if you email me at ribbonroach@gmail.com

info on emperor scorpions just incase:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emperor_scorpion

http://exoticpets.about.com/cs/scorpions/a/emperorscorpion.htm

http://www.wikihow.com/Care-for-Emperor-Scorpions 

http://reptileapartment.com/2010/04/16/captive-care-of-the-emperor-scorpion-pandinus-imperator/

**(also, i recommend heating pads that attach to the sides or bottom of the tank instead of a heat lamp if you live in a dry area, as the heat lamp could dry your scorpion out intensely) (also, try not to use tweezers upon picking your scorpion up, and make sure if you use tongs that they’re padded at the ends)

going to reblog this because as of right now i assume she has at least 10 or more. so i definitely need to find people who want any.

I want but but I live in Canada :(((((((((((( urg

its bed time for the babies

its bed time for the babies

leahsherpadventures:

Some fun pictures from the Nat. History Museum in downtown D.C.

(via reptiglo)

growingupgu:

Woke up to see a tiny dirt covered dino this morn’.

growingupgu:

Woke up to see a tiny dirt covered dino this morn’.

(via farsnakes)

The constant stare i am put through and his no more food look

fuckyeahballpythons:

blackyote:

via The Retic Nation.
I love this because that’s probably how some people feel about their retic, and it’s a great shirt for some of the owners, too.  XD

Literally like half of the people on the Retic Nation should probably have this shirt.

fuckyeahballpythons:

blackyote:

via The Retic Nation.

I love this because that’s probably how some people feel about their retic, and it’s a great shirt for some of the owners, too.  XD

Literally like half of the people on the Retic Nation should probably have this shirt.

(via superpredatorsexoticreptiles)

hearts-of-fire:

Idk why my camera hates Squirt but loves most of my others. Anywho here are some washed out pictures of Squirt playing on his new toys [x]

(via herpetology-world)

sunflic:

A paw for your viewing pleasure

sunflic:

A paw for your viewing pleasure

fuckyeahrainbowboas:

Caramel (T+ Albino) Brazilian Rainbow Boa - Jaroslav Gilar

fuckyeahrainbowboas:

Caramel (T+ Albino) Brazilian Rainbow Boa - Jaroslav Gilar

(via snakefan88)

Red bellers!!

Red bellers!!

libutron:

Woma python  (Ramsay’s Python, Woma)
The Woma python is an Endangered python belonging to the species Aspidites ramsayi (Pythonidae), distinguished from other Australian pythons by its narrow head which is barely distinct from the neck.
This species is found in the Australian interior, from central Australia into the south-western edge of Queensland, and into northern South Australia. There is also one coastal area in north-eastern Australia around the Pilbara coast where this species is found.
References: [1] - [2]
Photo credit: ©Jordan Vos
Locality: The Pilbara, Western Australia

libutron:

Woma python  (Ramsay’s Python, Woma)

The Woma python is an Endangered python belonging to the species Aspidites ramsayi (Pythonidae), distinguished from other Australian pythons by its narrow head which is barely distinct from the neck.

This species is found in the Australian interior, from central Australia into the south-western edge of Queensland, and into northern South Australia. There is also one coastal area in north-eastern Australia around the Pilbara coast where this species is found.

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©Jordan Vos

Locality: The Pilbara, Western Australia

(via reptilefacts)

Anonymous said: I hear all these rules about how to tell the difference between alligators and crocodiles and apparently there is actually no clear way of doing so? Can you please shed some light on this D: I'm confused

markscherz:

The rules for distinguishing between alligators and crocodiles are not very helpful in most of the world, because in most of the world either (a) no crocodilians are present, (b) only crocodiles or only alligators are present, and you should not need to tell the difference between anything, or (c) whether or not it’s a croc or an alligator doesn’t matter, you still shouldn’t be anywhere near it. (also caiman and dwarf crocodiles confuse things a bit)

That being said, to the best of my knowledge, most of the rules are in fact true. The tooth thing, the head shape thing, etc. The important thing to remember is that alligators are stub-faced chubby bunnylizards, whereas crocodiles are snaggletooth goober-monsters.

morelia-viridis:

GREEN TREE PYTHON RESOURCE MASTERPOST

Green tree pythons, while not the scary monsters some claim them to be, aren’t corn snakes or ball pythons and do have their own particular needs. These are animals where you need to do your homework ahead of time. I can’t emphasize enough that they—like any animal—should not be an impulse purchase. For those who want to own them, read and absorb as much information as you can. And then keep reading and learning, because as we learn more about these creatures, husbandry methods evolve and change.

I’ll link this post on my sidebar and try to update the info as needed.

* * * BOOKS * * *

  • The More Complete Chondro by Greg Maxwell

    The chondro bible.  While the info may not be as cutting edge as when it was first published, it’s still a solid foundation of information and should be read by anyone wanting to get into chondros.

    HardcovereBook, Kindle | eBook, Nook

  • Adventures in Green Python Country by Karl-Heinz Switak

    To my knowledge, this book is out of print. I have not read it, but have heard it’s a good read.

  • The Green Tree Python and Emerald Tree Boa: Care, Breeding and Natural History, Second Extended Edition by Ron Kivit and Stephen Wiseman

    I haven’t had a chance to read this one myself.

    Paperback

* * * ARTICLES * * *

 

* * * FORUMS * * *

  • Morelia Viridis Forum

    MVF is THE forum for chondro information. They now have a basic husbandry section, but the real treasure is the wealth of information in past threads. The search function is your friend. There is a ton of info there. Plenty of differing opinions and ways to do things, and it’s useful to read it all.

  • Morelia Pythons Forum

    I haven’t spent much time here myself, but it’s another resource for chondro info.

* * * RADIO * * *

  • Green Tree Python Keeper Radio (Blogtalk Radio | iTunes)

    They’ve had on important folks like Daniel Natusch (biologist who has studied chondros in the field) and Trooper Walsh (chondro pioneer, former keeper at NZP). Greg Maxwell is also slated to be on an upcoming show.

  • Morelia Python Radio (Blogtalk Radio | iTunes)

    Shows covering all Morelia species, not just chondros. They’ve had guests such as Rico Walder, David Newman, Gary Schiavino, Kimbery Burge, Marcial Mendez, Greg Stephens, Buddy Buscemi, Terry Phillip, etc.

* * * SCIENTIFIC PAPERS * * *

  • GTPKeeper.com hosts a number of scientific papers relating to green tree pythons.

(via herpetology-world)

snekysnek:

Bee and Normal are out! Now to wait for the Lesser to emerge and the other two eggs to pip.♥

Normal’s weight looks like it’s actually 79g. 79-80g. *shrugs*
I love their cutie little snoots!